Copying EXIF metadata between files

This tip might be useful for those cases when an editor ignores a photo meta-information (which seems fairly common in phones).

$ exiftool -TagsFromFile source.jpg target.jpg

or

$ exiv2 ex -e e source.jpg  # Extraction. Also $ exiftool -exif -b source.jpg > source.exv
$ mv source.exv target.exv  # Names must match
$ exiv2 in -i e target.jpg  # Injection

Relevation 1.2 released

I've just published a new version of Relevation.

The biggest change is that it can now combine search terms, useful to reduce the number of results when you've got multiple similar logins alike. Check the updated man page for more details.

There's also a couple of small but important bugfixes.

See the changelog for the full list.

It will now handle wrong passwords a bit more gracefully and it's also easier to use on Windows now.


Relevation 1.2

http://p.outlyer.net/relevation/files/relevation-1.2.tar.gz
or
http://p.outlyer.net/relevation/files/relevation-1.2.zip (zip includes PDF and HTML manpage)

pre-packaged
http://p.outlyer.net/relevation/files/relevation_1.2-pon.1_all.deb

Debian users can now also use my apt repository located at http://packages.outlyer.net. Instructions are provided there.

New tool release: Quick File Share for Android

I've published my second android app, a bit more useful than the first one (and also more prone to be a source of problems :P).

Quick File Share is meant to ease file sharing between devices by using a Wi-Fi network. Sharing content between Androids sucks: you can use bluetooth for a painfully slow experience or use email or cloud storage, with the unnecessary upload (which is also extremely slow for most people), while NFC is just a fancy way of triggering a bluetooth transfer; and that's about it.
Wi-Fi Direct (aka Wi-Fi P2P) finally emerged as a solution, but that requires discrete hardware that only newer devices have.
Meanwhile, if the devices are connected to a Wi-Fi network, than speedy, wireless, and already set up connection can't really be taken advantage of by default. That's the spot this app helps in filling, and it's certainly not the only option, but I couldn't help trying.

Select a file to share, and a temporary webserver will be started on the "sending" device. It will display a QR code and an HTTP address, so that the receiving device(s) can receive the file by just typing the address in a browser or scanning the code (scanning the code will also trigger the browser). The actual transfer is always over HTTP, so you can actually receive the file on essentially any device with network access.

What's the catch? There's always a catch. At least for the time being, the two devices must be connected to the same network. There are other tools on the marketplace that help the receiving device connect to the same network as the sender, but I didn't like that operation too much, so I preferred this way of operation.

Google Play Entry
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.outlyer.quickshare
Project Page
http://p.outlyer.net/quickshare/

Screen captures:

Main window

Quick File Share

Main window, sharing enabled

Quick File Share, sharing enabled